Definition of Thanks

“Thanks” or“Thank you” is a word used as an expression of gratitude for a gift, service, or favor.

The act of expressing gratitude, especially to another person.

“Thanks” is an informal form of “Thank you.” Although both have the same meaning.

When you say “thank you,” you are expressing your gratitude for something that someone has done, either for you or another person.

You might say “thank you” to someone who has held the door open for you, or to a friend who has given you a gift.

The word Thanks

The word “thanks” is derived from the Old English word þanc, meaning “thought or gratitude.”

This, in turn, comes from the Proto-Germanic word “thankuz”, which also gave rise to the Dutch word Dank and the German word Danke.

The first-ever recorded use of the word in English was in the 14th century.

Thanks can be an interjection, a noun, or a verb.

Meaning of Thanks

An expression of gratitude.

A feeling of gratitude.

What does “Thanks” mean?

The word “Thanks” is used as a way to express gratitude.

Thanking someone is a way of showing that you appreciate what they have done. It is also a way of showing that you are polite and have good manners.

Usage of Thanks

Saying “thanks” is just one of many ways to show appreciation. Other ways include saying “please” “sorry” and “excuse me.”

The word “thanks” is used to express gratitude, appreciation, or recognition. It can be used as a standalone exclamation, as part of a sentence, or as part of a larger phrase.

“Thanks” or “Thank you” can also be used informally to express positive feelings, such as when you are happy or relieved.

Here are some examples of how you might use “Thanks/Thank you” in a sentence:

  • Thank you very much for your help.
  • Thank you so much for your help.
  • Thank you for your help.
  • Thank you for your time.
  • Thank you very much for your hospitality.

When used informally to express positive feelings, “thanks” can be followed by words or phrases such as “very much,” “so much,” and “a lot.”

For example:

  • Thanks so much for your help.
  • Thanks a lot for your help.
  • Thanks a lot.
  • Thanks a bunch.
  • Thanks a million.
  • Thanks, but I did all of this by myself.
  • Thanks, I really appreciate you listening to my story.

In less formal situations, you can also use expressions such as “thank you very much” and “thank you very much indeed.”

For example:

  • Thank you very much for your help.
  • Thank you very much indeed for your help.

If you want to emphasize how grateful you are, you can use expressions such as “I really appreciate it” or “I’m very grateful.”

For example:

  • Thanks so much for your help – I really appreciate it.
  • Thanks a lot for your help – I’m very grateful.

In more formal situations, you can say “thank you for your kind help” or “thank you for your valuable help.”

For example:

  • Thank you for your kind help.
  • Thank you for your valuable help.

We can also say thanks in many other ways, such as:

In Britain, people sometimes say “ta” instead of “thanks”:

Ta for the lift. (Thanks for the lift.)

In the United States, people sometimes say “Thanks a bunch” or “Thanks a million” as a way of saying “No thanks”:

Person A: Would you like a cup of coffee?

Person B: Thanks a million, but I’ve already had two today. (No thanks, I don’t want any more.)

If someone has done something that you think was very kind or helpful, you can say “That was very good of you”:

It was very good of you to help me with my homework.

Here are a few more scenarios in which “Thanks/Thank you” is used:

In very informal situations, people sometimes say “Cheers” instead of “Thanks.”

Cheers for the loan of your bike. (Thanks for letting me borrow your bike.)

If you want to thank someone for something they have done, but they do not expect you to, you can say “Thank you very much indeed”:

Thank you very much indeed for all your help.

When someone does something that is helpful or kind, you can also say “That’s very kind of you”:

You didn’t have to help me, but that was very kind of you.

When someone has done something that makes you happy or satisfied, you can say “Thank goodness for that” or “I’m glad about that”:

Thank goodness we’re here at last. We’ve been driving for hours.

When someone has done something that makes a difficult situation better, you can say “That’s very considerate of you”:

It was very considerate of you to come and see me in hospital.

Other definitions

The definition of allowing is “to permit or consent to.” When you

Esther Hicks is the one who “interprets” Abraham. Hence Jerry Hicks

Your Point of Attraction is your emotional vantage point from which